Establishment of Banks Blog

Kleinanlegerschutzgesetz: Regulations for FinTechs (Part 2)

The German legislature ratified the final draft of the Kleinalegerschutzgesetz, Germany’s new investor protection law, which became effective 10 July 2015 (see also my previous blog on the early stages of the early stages of this law making process). However, not all the provisions were implemented in July; exceptions apply on the provisions of Art 13 (1) and (2), which come into effect on 1 January 2016 and 3 January 2017 respectively.

1. New rules

The Kleinanlegerschutzgesetz introduces the following major changes:

  • Specification and Extension of the obligation to publish a prospectus,

Consultation of the guidance notice for managing directors – The main focus is on material requirements

Part of the European harmonisation process is the development of uniform requirements concerning the managing director. They are also the key aspect of the consultation of the guidance notice of the Financial Supervisory Authority (BaFin) of 19th January 2015. There are some modifications:


BaFin drafted separated guidance notice for the scope of the Banking Act (Kreditwesengesetz), the German Payment Services Supervision Act (Zahlungsaufsichtsgesetz) and the Investment Act (Kapitalanlagenschutzbuch) and a separate guidance notice for the Insurance Supervision Act (Versicherungsaufsichtsgesetz). Hence BaFin expects a more clear structure.


Establishment of banks: an option for corporations? – Part 2

As explained in the preceding post regarding the recent PwC-Whitepaper “Establishment of banks: an option for corporations?”, the establishment of corporate-owned banks is not a strategic option for the german industrial sector even though the automotive industry is using them with great success.

These results contrast with the high demand for individualized financial services. Every other surveyed corporation wishes for increased efficiency and professionalization of financing activities within the firm. Beyond that working capital-management (36%), securing sales (34%), securing the supply-chain (27%) and diversification of business activities (27%) were central needs.

Establishment of banks: an option for corporations? – Part 1

It’s hard to imagine an automotive industry without corporate-owned financial institutions. Sector expertise concerning customer data, residual values and distribution channels allow for lending and leasing as well as the offering of appropriate insurance-models at attractive terms. In addition to these products the corporate-owned banks also offer classic banking products such as day-to-day money or credit cards. Thus they do not only optimize corporate financial activity but also enhance customer loyalty. Are corporate-owned banks therefore the next logical step towards an evolved industrial business model and can increased establishment be expected in the future?

Swiss banks: New chances for market entry in Germany by means of a simplified regulatory framework

FINMA and BaFIN finally came to an agreement regarding all the required concrete measures for the so called “Simplified Exemption Procedure”. Thereby the regulatory framework for the market entry of Swiss banks in Germany will be facilitated.


In the past, Swiss banks going for a business activity in Germany without establishing a physical presence were required to meet several conditions which made conducting business operations more complicated. In particular, Swiss banks had to involve a locally active German / EEA bank for the customer identification of private clients.

New 5th edition of Banking Business in Germany is due for 2016

As time goes by …

Although it seems to me as if the 4th edition of Banking Business in Germany was finalised only yesterday: The regulatory pace is still high and changes the framework of the financial services market day by day. So the authors from Association of Foreign Banks in Germany (Verband der Auslandsbanken in Deutschland e.V.) and PwC will convene once more over the next months in order to implement the latest developments into a new 5th edition of this practical guide for foreign banks establishing a subsidiary or a branch in Germany.

Calculation of the contributions to the German deposit guarantee scheme – Overview and preview of the new contributions regulation

When establishing or acquiring a bank in Germany, a regulatory business plan must be provided to the German Federal Financial Supervisory Authority which contains, amongst other things, the expected costs. These costs include the mandatory contribution payments to the German deposit guarantee scheme Entschädigungseinrichtung deutscher Banken GmbH (EdB).

EU-Passport: BaFin publishes forms for notification procedure

CRR-credit institutions or securities trading firms may conduct banking business or provide financial services in another EEA state via a branch or by providing cross border services without being obliged to apply for a license at the host member state’s competent authority. As a precondition, the company has to be licensed by the German Federal Financial Supervisory Authority (Bundesanstalt für Finanzdienstleistungsaufsicht – BaFin), the license has to cover the planned business in the host member state, the company is efficiently supervised in Germany and undertook the notification procedure at BaFin.

Revised Directive on Payment Services (PSD2)

There is new activity within the project to update and amend the provisions of the Directive on Payment Services. On 5 May 2015, the Parliament and Council agreed on a new proposal for a revised version of the Directive on Payment Services following trilogue negotiations between the Commission, the European Parliament and the Council of Ministers.

Already in July 2013, the Commission had drafted a proposal for a “Directive of the European Parliament and of the Council on payment services in the internal market and amending Directives 2002/65/EC, 2013/36/EU and 2009/110/EC and repealing Directive 2007/64/EC” (so-called PSD2).

Revised Deposit Guarantee Schemes Directive implemented in Germany

The implementation act changes the definition of deposits eligible for compensation, introduces new reporting requirements and extends information requirements.


The revised Deposit Guarantee Schemes Directive (Directive 2014/49/EU of the European Parliament and of the Council of 16 April 2014, DGS Directive) provides new and largely harmonized rules at EU level for deposit protection. It aims to protect as many deposits as possible in favor of comprehensive consumer protection and in the interest of financial stability. The provisions form one of the pillars of the European Bank Union and are connected closely to the regulations on bank recovery and resolution.